Category Archives: Literature

The law of the jungle: one touch of nature in Rajasthan’s cities and villages

“Mowgli had never seen an Indian city before, and though this was almost a heap of ruins it seemed very wonderful and splendid… Trees had grown into and out of the walls; the battlements were tumbled down and decayed, and wild creepers hung out of the windows of the towers on the walls in bushy hanging clumps.”

“There was a ruined summer-house of white marble in the centre of the terrace, built for queens dead a hundred years ago. The domed roof had half fallen in… But the walls were made of screens of marble tracery–beautiful milk-white fretwork, set with agates and cornelians and jasper and lapis lazuli, and as the moon came up behind the hill it shone through the open work, casting shadows on the ground like black velvet embroidery.”

Rudyard Kipling, The Jungle Book

The cities of Rajasthan teem with people and with vehicles – filling the air with deafening noise, and pollution you can taste on your tongue. In Delhi and Jaipur’s urban jungle, the roads are a slow river of thick, unending traffic and the pavements stream with humanity. It can be hard to put one foot in front of the other without risk of stepping ankle-deep into a worryingly coloured pool of stinking liquid, while motorbikes, tuk-tuks and overloaded carts bearing curious and precarious loads – flattened eggboxes stacked three metres high, bulging sacks of tumorous tubers – barge past, horns blaring as you jump for safety. Nature is not immediately evident in the face of all this urban chaos.

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Street market in Jaipur
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Jodhpur centre
And yet, look – the family of monkeys lolling above the sign on the jewellery shop; the pack of black kites wheeling in the sky. And human inhabitants live comfortably side-by-side with their fellow creatures, sometimes quite literally: we pass a house in Udaipur where one of the downstairs rooms has been converted into a stable; a white horse hangs his head out of the window while the family prepare their evening meal in the adjacent kitchen. In Agra, pigs root through piles of rubbish and sacred cows wander, miraculously unharmed, along dual carriageways, along with the occasional elephant walking the slow lane. Sometimes there is the surprising vision of a camel, festooned in bright ribbons and daubed in colourful paint, trotting past your car window.

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Snake charmers in Jaipur. Unwelcome snakes are removed from local houses by these Hindu snake men, who first apologise to the snake, explain they are doing it for their wages and promise to keep it no longer than an agreed amount of days before setting it free.
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Rhesus Macaque monkeys in Jaipur
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Driving out of Agra
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On the road in Jaipur
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White-throated Kingfisher Halcyon smyrnensis on Udaipur lake
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Moving into the villages of rural Rajasthan, nature regains its dominion. People still live in thrall to its caprices,  from the unpredictability of the monsoon rains, to the leopards that visit in the night and carry off the family pig or dog.  In Rohet, outside of Jodhpur, we visit a tiny, one-family village of Bishnoi people, living in circular huts moulded out of mud and dung with straw roofs. The members of the family are grinding spices and tending the cows and they give us a cheerful wave as we arrive and as we drive away.

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Blackbuck or Indian Antelope, around Rohet

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Rohet Garh haveli
The old haveli where we are staying is opulent by comparison. It also affords a great view of a small lake where bee-eaters whirl and swoop like colourful paper kites over the trees, and sunbirds hop and hover in the blossoms of the frangipani bushes.

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Purple Sunbird Cinnyris asiaticus
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Female purple sunbird
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Green Bee-eater Merops orientalis
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Local women in Rohet carrying stones to build a path
We are also lucky to spend two nights in Ranthambore national park. Early morning jeep safaris, complete with thick blankets and hot water bottles, take us into the countryside where we see a tigress sated by her kill, parts of which remain scattered around her as she yawns, stretches and sleeps. Above her, the sun’s rays break through the mist, silvering the surface of a lake where wading birds bob and scoop amongst the lilies and weeds. As the light strengthens, the forest comes to life with the sounds of birds and other fauna: sambar deer and spotted deer – both trying to impress the females of their respective species as they lock antlers and fight. Treepies squawk in branches, and there’s the ‘pick-pick’ of bulbuls as they land on a bush. Once, a glorious lesser-goldenback woodpecker swoops past.

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Spotted deer
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Red-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus cafer
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Large Grey Babbler Turdoides malcolmi
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Collared Scops Owl Otus lettia
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Little Cormorant Phalacrocorax niger, alarmed by a crocodile
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Male Sambar deer
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Grey Langurs warming up in the morning sunshine
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Rufous Treepie Dendrocitta vagabunda
In Narlai, another village between Jodhpur and Udaipur, grey langur monkeys stare back at me from the other side of the window when I open the shutters in the early morning. We go down into the still dusky courtyard of our haveli and climb into a jeep that takes us out into the countryside to look for leopards. Farmers in their huts are starting their day’s chores, lighting fires; the women walk out – pots balanced on heads – to get water from the pump, or go to visit one of the many temples that dot the landscape. Woodsmoke rises from the huts and mingles with the still dawn-grey sky. Peafowl are everywhere, perched in trees, on top of temples, or running down the road while Indian robins hop up and down in the branches next to us.

 

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Narlai haveli courtyard in the evening
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The distinctive landscape around Narlai
 

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A gazelle gazes at us from the safety of a screen of trees; a wild boar charges behind a cactus hedge. A large moving blob on a distant rocky outcrop provokes excitement, but it proves to be, not a leopard, but a very large mongoose. Minutes later, a family of three more run across the road in front of us and a honey buzzard surveys us regally from a tree-top. As the sun appears, pink and rosy over the horizon, we stop and drink hot chai and eat sweet biscuits. A tiny temple, high on a rock, is surrounded by peacocks, one of whom is dancing a sun salutation, tail feathers fanned behind him as the peahens look on, unimpressed. No leopards, then, but a very special, peaceful way to see the land and wake up with its inhabitants.

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Oriental Honey-buzzard Pernis ptilorhyncus

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Sunrise over the Narlai countryside
“Now Rann the Kite brings home the night

That Mang the Bat sets free.

The herds are shut in byre and hut,

For loosed till dawn are we.

This is the hour of pride and power,

Talon and tush and claw.

Oh, hear the call!—Good hunting all

That keep the Jungle Law!”

 

Rudyard Kipling The Jungle Book

Who knew crickets liked Shakespeare?

Back at work and adjusting to city life after five weeks of being outdoors and at one with the elements in Greece. The balcony, despite the best intentions of a neighbour, had shrivelled to a brown tangle of dried-out twigs. I thought it was done for. Yet, with a generous daily dousing of water, the lantana is back in flower, the hibiscus unfurling new blossoms and the clematis clearly thinks it is spring all over again. The gecko looks happier now he has some foliage to hide in once more. The only plant that has continued its advances unaffected by any changes in temperature or atmospheric conditions it seems, is the chili-monster. What am I going to do with yet another kilo of chilli peppers?

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At school the students all returned (eventually) tanned and, for the most part, smiling and happy. The weather remains hot and very humid and this has contributed to a marked increase in the population of another inhabitant of the school – the common black cricket. Last Monday I began the day by chasing out sixteen of these beauties from my classroom.

Common black cricket or field cricket
Common black cricket Gryllus assimilis

Followed by another ten or so an hour later. While I believe that learning should be for everyone, these chaps are quite disruptive, breaking out into ear-splitting song at any inopportune moment during my lesson. Threats of staying in at break or visits to the principal have no effect on them. Plus, my students (who all seem to live in hermetically sealed apartments far away from any contact with earth, plants or wildlife) only have to see one of these Gryllus assimilis scuttling away behind the skirting board to set up such a cacophony of shrieks and screams you’d think I’d introduced a slavering grizzly bear into the room. So I adopt my most sensible, Victorian governess tone of voice while explaining that these creatures are completely harmless and they perform a useful job of eating other annoying flies and insects.

I’m sure, when the weather cools, they will disappear. And at least I had some sort of response – albeit high-pitched and musical – when I asked the class, ‘Which Shakespearean character could hear “the owl scream and the crickets cry?”‘

(Gryllus replied correctly by the way – turns out he’s a good student after all. So, what was his answer?)